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Growth performance and cost benefit of weaner rabbits fed cassava peel as substitute for maize

 Department: Agricultural Extension and Management  
 By: usericon bapatigi7954  

 Project ID: 7444
   Rating:  (5.0) votes: 1
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   Price:₦2000
Abstract
The study aimed to investigate the growth performance and cost-benefit of weaner rabbits fed cassava peel as a substitute for maize. 36 weaner rabbits were used to assess the growth performance and cost-benefit of weaner rabbits fed cassava peel as a substitute for maize. Four diets were formulated, diet 1 (control), 2, 3, and 4 which maize was substituted for cassava peel at 0%, 15%, 30% and 45% respectively. The 36 rabbits were used in a completely randomized design with four treatments and three animal replicates per treatment. The trial lasted for 8weeks. Parameters measured were feed intake, weight gain, feed conversation ratio and cost benefit. It was observed that there was no significant difference (P0.05) in the weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio. The result of the cost of feed, cost of feed consumed per rabbit and feed cost per weight gain were significantly different (P0.05) across the dietary levels. Cost of feed decreased with an increased level of cassava peel, the highest cost of feed produced (N654.56) was obtained in treatment one, while the lowest cost of feed produced was obtained in treatment four (N 399.94). Cost of feed consumed per rabbit is more expensive (647.25) in treatment one, while while least expensive in treatment (N 415.93) in treatment four. Best feed cost per weight gain (1260.39 N/kg) was obtained in treatment four while the poorest feed cost per weight gain (1674.13 N/kg) was obtained in treatment two. It was therefore concluded that maize could be substituted by cassava peel at 45% inclusion which proved to be more economical in terms of production, adopting this level of inclusion will enable the farmer to maximize profit through the reduction in the cost of feed production. ...
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